Dr Adam Chapman

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Contact details

Name:
Dr Adam Chapman
Qualifications:
PhD (Southampton), MA Medieval History (UEA)
Position:
Editor and Training Coordinator
Institute:
Institute of Historical Research
Location:
Victoria County History Institute of Historical Research University of London Senate House London WC1E 7HU
Phone:
020 7862 8799
Email address:
adam.chapman@sas.ac.uk
Website:
http://www.history.ac.uk/about/adam-chapman

Research Summary and Profile

Research interests:
Archaeology, Colonies & Colonization, emigration & immigration, History, Manuscript studies, Medieval History, Modern History , Palaeography, Regional history
Research keywords:
Medieval Engalnd, Local History, Medieval Wales, Wales, regional history, Military History
Regions:
England, United Kingdom, Wales
Summary of research interests and expertise:

Before joining the Victoria History of the Counties of England (VCH), Adam worked on the AHRC-funded project, ‘The Soldier in later Medieval England, 1369-1453’, and in a variety of teaching and research roles at several UK Higher Education institutions. Adam specialises in the history of Wales and England from the thirteenth century to the fifteenth, but through his work with the VCH has research interests across the whole of recorded history of England from the Middle Ages to the very recent past.

His personal research interests include the cultural effects of war on medieval society, the development of the medieval landscape, and tracing the lives and careers of individuals through documentary records. He is also interested in the development and application of new technology to historical and archaeological research. He has published on the role of Wales and the Welsh in later medieval England.

Languages:
Spoken Written
Latin - Intermediate
French Good Good
Other Good Intermediate
Other: Welsh
Publication Details

Publications available on SAS-space:

Date Details
Jun-2017 Learning Rapidly about the Relevance of Visual Cues Requires Conscious Awareness

PeerReviewed

Humans have been shown capable of performing many cognitive tasks using information of which they are not consciously aware. This raises questions about what role consciousness actually plays in cognition. Here, we explored whether participants can learn cue-target contingencies in an attentional learning task when the cues were presented below the level of conscious awareness, and how this differs from learning about conscious cues. Participants’ manual (Experiment 1) and saccadic (Experiment 2) response speeds were influenced by both conscious and unconscious cues. However, participants were only able to adapt to reversals of the cue-target contingencies (Experiment 1) or changes in the reliability of the cues (Experiment 2) when consciously aware of the cues. Therefore, although visual cues can be processed unconsciously, learning about cues over a few trials requires conscious awareness of them. Finally, we discuss implications for cognitive theories of consciousness.

Jun-2017 Content in Simple Signalling Systems

PeerReviewed

Our understanding of communication and its evolution has advanced significantly through the study of simple models involving interacting senders and receivers of signals. Many theorists have thought that the resources of mathematical information theory are all that are needed to capture the meaning or content that is being communicated in these systems. However, the way theorists routinely talk about the models implicitly draws on a conception of content that is richer than bare informational content, especially in contexts where false content is important. This article shows that this concept can be made precise by defining a notion of functional content that captures the degree to which different states of the world are involved in stabilizing senders’ and receivers’ use of a signal at equilibrium. A series of case studies is used to contrast functional content with informational content, and to illustrate the explanatory role and limitations of this definition of functional content.

Mar-2018 Metacognition and Abstract Concepts

PeerReviewed

The problem of how concepts can refer to or be about the non‐mental world is particularly puzzling for abstract concepts. There is growing evidence that many characteristics beyond the perceptual are involved in grounding different kinds of abstract concept. A resource that has been suggested, but little explored, is introspection. This paper develops that suggestion by focusing specifically on metacognition—on the thoughts and feelings that thinkers have about a concept. One example of metacognition about concepts is the judgement that we should defer to others in how a given concept is used. Another example is our internal assessment of which concepts are dependable and useful, and which less so. Metacognition of this kind may be especially important for grounding abstract concepts.

Mar-2018 Metacognition and Abstract Concepts

PeerReviewed

The problem of how concepts can refer to or be about the non‐mental world is particularly puzzling for abstract concepts. There is growing evidence that many characteristics beyond the perceptual are involved in grounding different kinds of abstract concept. A resource that has been suggested, but little explored, is introspection. This paper develops that suggestion by focusing specifically on metacognition—on the thoughts and feelings that thinkers have about a concept. One example of metacognition about concepts is the judgement that we should defer to others in how a given concept is used. Another example is our internal assessment of which concepts are dependable and useful, and which less so. Metacognition of this kind may be especially important for grounding abstract concepts.

Research Projects & Supervisions

Research projects:

Details
Victoria County History of England

 The Greatest Publishing Project in English Local History

The VCH was founded in 1899 as a private enterprise, with the intention of producing a history of each English county to a standard plan which, in the words of Arthur Doubleday, the founding general editor, made ‘a special feature of general articles which should bring into prominence the main characteristics of every phase of county life’.

Today the VCH produces red books, paperbacks, and web resources. It has a Central Office in London and works with a mixture of professional county staff and volunteers. In recent years new initiatives have been taken in several counties where little or no work had taken place for many decades, and the widespread interest in local and family history means that the VCH continues to have a vital part to play in the promotion of English local history.

Professional Affiliations

Collaborations:

Name Type Activity Start date End date
The Soldier in Later Medieval England, 1369-1453 Project participant PhD researcher 01-Oct-2006 30-Sep-2009
Relevant Events

Related events:

Date Details
31-Jul-2015 War on Land and Sea: 600th Anniversary of the Battle of Agincourt Conference 2015

 An international conference to commemorate the 600th anniversary of the battle of Agincourt.

Consultancy & Media
Available for consultancy:
Yes
Media experience:
Yes
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