Dr Judith Townend

Contact details

Name:
Dr Judith Townend
Qualifications:
MA, PhD
Position/Fellowship type:
Associate Research Fellow
Fellowship term:
03-Oct-2014
Institute:
Institute of Advanced Legal Studies
Email address:
Judith.Townend@sussex.ac.uk
Website:
http://www.sussex.ac.uk/profiles/373643

Research Summary and Profile

Research interests:
Communications, Digital resources, Digitisation, Human rights, Law, Social Sciences
Regions:
England, Ireland, Scotland, United Kingdom, Wales
Summary of research interests and expertise:

Judith Townend is a lecturer in media and information law at the University of Sussex and an associate research fellow at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS). Previously she was director of the Information Law and Policy Centre (@infolawcentre) at the IALS.

Before joining IALS, Judith was a lecturer in City University London’s department of journalism, and research associate at University of Westminster on an AHRC-funded project looking at media plurality and ownership.

Her doctoral research, based at the Centre for Law, Justice and Journalism (CLJJ) at City University London, examined defamation and privacy law and its relationship with journalistic practice in England and Wales.

She is particularly interested in interdisciplinary interrogation of information and communication law and policy, using socio-legal methods and approaches from the social sciences and humanities to understand legal developments.

Her research covers a range of legal and social topics connected by a common theme of public access to information: the policy and law that governs and facilitates access; the role of organisations and individuals that facilitate access; and the implications of different types of access for democracy and civic participation in society.

She has contributed to a range of specialist media publications, and can be found on Twitter, @jtownend.

 

Publication Details

Related publications/articles:

Date Details
20-Jun-2017 Freedom of Expression and the Chilling Effect

Edited Book

The Routledge Companion to Media and Human Rights offers a comprehensive and contemporary survey of the key themes, approaches and debates in the field of media and human rights. This chapter considers the history and relevance of the 'chilling effect' concept for law and society. Townend, J., 2017. Freedom of Expression and the Chilling Effect. In: H. Tumber and S.R. Waisbord, eds., The Routledge companion to media and human rights. London?; New York: Routledge.

05-May-2017 Data Protection and the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ in Practice: A UK Perspective

Articles

Based on a presentation given to the International Association of Law Libraries in August 2016. We are in an uncertain and complex period for data protection and privacy in Europe, and especially so in the UK, following the result of the ‘Brexit’ referendum on 23 June 2016. Information law, and data protection in particular, are of increasing concern for those in the business of knowledge sharing and information dissemination: media organizations, academic institutions and libraries. The notion of the ‘right to be forgotten’ is particularly troublesome, as lawyers, archivists, historians and philosophers grapple with the theoretical and practical implications. This article presents a selection of recent European and British policy and legal developments, and discusses how they are changing social practice and citizens’ engagement with information rights. Townend, J. (2017). Data Protection and the ‘Right to be Forgotten’ in Practice: A UK Perspective. International Journal of Legal Information, 45(1), 28-33. doi:10.1017/jli.2017.2

20-Mar-2017 Communications Law: Special issue

Conference papers

Communications Law 22(1), 2017. Eds: Wragg, P. and Townend, J. This special issue celebrates the first anniversary of the Information Law and Policy Centre (ILPC) at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. It features three contributions from leading commentators who participated in the ILPC’s annual conference ‘Restricted and redacted: where now for human rights and digital information control?’, which was held on 9 November 2016 and sponsored by Bloomsbury Professional.

22-Feb-2017 Protecting sources and whistleblowers in a digital age

Papers

Townend, Judith and Danbury, Richard (2017) Protecting sources and whistleblowers in a digital age. Project Report. Information Law and Policy Centre, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. A working report published as part of an initiative supported by Guardian News and Media, based on research conducted at the Information Law and Policy Centre, Institute of Advanced Legal Studies. Launched at an event in Parliament on 22nd February 2017.

01-Jun-2016 Charitable journalism: oxymoron or opportunity?

Articles

Townend, J. (2016) ‘Charitable journalism: oxymoron or opportunity?’, Ethical Space Vol.13 No.2/3

01-Jun-2016 Beyond clickbait and commerce: The ethics, possibilities and challenges of not-for-profit media

Edited Book

Townend. J., Muller, D. and Keeble, R.L. (2016). Beyond clickbait and commerce: The ethics, possibilities and challenges of not-for-profit media, Ethical Space, Vol.13 No.2/3, Abramis.

23-Mar-2016 The impact of charity and tax law/regulation on not-for-profit news organizations

Papers

Townend, J. 2016. ‘The United Kingdom: The impact of charity and tax law/regulation on not-for-profit news organizations’. In The impact of charity and tax law/regulation on not-for-profit news organizations, edited by Picard, R. Belair-Gagnon, V. and Ranchordás, S. Oxford/Yale: Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism / Information Society Project, Yale Law School

16-Feb-2016 Censorship and National Security: Information Control in the Second World War and Present Day

Articles

Irving, H. and Townend, J. (2016) ‘Censorship and National Security: Information Control in the Second World War and Present Day’, History & Policy, 10 February

22-May-2015 Media Power and Plurality: From Hyperlocal to High-Level Policy

Edited Book

Barnett, S. and Townend, J. eds., 2015. Media Power and Plurality. Palgrave Global Media Policy and Business. London: Palgrave Macmillan.

Democratic governments throughout the world aspire to plurality and diversity of voice as a policy goal, which is fundamental to a healthy democracy. Over the last 20 years, however, economics, technology, political ideology and global corporate power have often conspired to frustrate those normative aims. More recently, different plurality problems have been prompted by access issues and the burgeoning reach and power of digital intermediaries such as Google, Facebook and Amazon. While some countries, such as the UK and US, have seen little creative activity from policy makers, other countries have sought to explore new approaches to funding and to exploit new technologies at both national and local level. This edited collection, featuring international scholars from a range of disciplines, examines contemporary and emerging policy issues around media plurality from grassroots local initiatives to high-level policy debates in both mature and emerging democracies, in each case drawing out generalizable initiatives and ideas for policy thinking in an increasingly complex area.

 

22-May-2015 Hyperlocal Media and the News Marketplace

Chapters

Townend, J., 2015. Hyperlocal Media and the News Marketplace. In: Media Power and Plurality, Palgrave Global Media Policy and Business. London: Palgrave Macmillan, pp.83–98.

This chapter explores longstanding tensions between the private and public media sectors in the UK, focusing on new entrants to the ‘market’ or media landscape: hyperlocal and community websites and groups. Drawing on empirical evidence gathered by a collaborative research project and a range of policy and academic texts, it explores the benefits and drawbacks of a number of possible policy options for invigorating and sustaining local media, including methods of public subsidy, the development of charitably funded media, and the development of inter-organizational partnerships. It also considers a broader theoretical question about the assumptions of the ‘marketplace’ model used to develop pluralism-friendly policy: to what extent does this metaphoric terminology hinder the protection of media plurality and diversity of voices and editorial content?

09-Sep-2014 Plurality, Policy and the Local: Can hyperlocals fill the gap?

Journal articles

Barnett, S., and Townend, J., 2015. Plurality, Policy and the Local. Journalism Practice, 9(3), pp.332–349 (published online 9 September 2014).

Over the last 15 years, the acceleration in media consolidation has presented a series of policy challenges around diversity of editorial output. While policy debates on national ownership limits and other regulatory interventions are important, developments at the local level are often marginalised. And yet, the direction of travel—towards more consolidation and more deregulation—has arguably been more debilitating for democracy at the local level, where the vast majority of citizens interact with hospitals, schools, transport systems and local councils. The decline of local media—including, in some towns, the wholesale disappearance of local newspapers—leaves citizens starved of information and local institutions less accountable. This article uses an existing conceptual framework for assessing whether and how journalism makes a real-life contribution to democratic life at the local level. Against this normative framework, it then assesses the contribution of hyperlocal media sites to local democracy. We present findings from the most extensive survey of the hyperlocal sector to date, a collaboration with research partners at Cardiff and Birmingham City Universities and Talk About Local, which analysed online questionnaires from over 180 local online media initiatives. Our research offers a unique insight into the funding, operational problems and sustainability of community media sites, and suggests they have the potential to fulfil a vital democratic and civic role. These data inform our conclusions and recommendations for policy initiatives that would invigorate hyperlocal sites and therefore provide a real alternative for otherwise democratically impoverished local communities.
 

05-Aug-2014 And What Good Came Of It At Last? Press-politician relations post Leveson

Journal articles

Barnett, S., and Townend, J., 2014. ‘And What Good Came of it at Last?’ Press–Politician Relations Post-Leveson. The Political Quarterly, 85(2), pp.159–169.

James Margach famously argued that Prime Ministers from Lloyd George to Callaghan had been intent on exploiting the media in their determination to centralise power. From Margaret Thatcher onwards, however, there is a strong argument that the power relationship has been reversed, and that the Leveson Inquiry—set up in the wake of the phone hacking scandal—exposed a political class which had become deeply fearful of the power and influence of the national press. Citing evidence to Leveson and subsequent recommendations by the inquiry, this article presents two case studies—on data protection and on media ownership—where the public interest clearly demanded political intervention, which would be inconvenient for the major publishers. And yet, despite recommendations by Lord Justice Leveson and despite clear support from leading politicians of all parties, there has been virtually no policy progress in either case. While the Leveson Inquiry was billed as a watershed in press–politician relations and an opportunity to counteract decades of unhealthy press power, political inertia in these two areas suggests that very little has changed.

 

31-Jul-2014 The State of UK Hyperlocal Community News: Findings from a survey of practitioners

Papers

Williams, A.,, Barnett, S.,, Harte, D., and Townend, J., 2014. The State of Hyperlocal Community News in the UK: Findings from a survey of practitioners.

This report is the result of a collaboration between two different AHRC-funded projects: the Media, Community and the Creative Citizen project, based at Cardiff and Birmingham City Universities; and the Media Power and Plurality project, based at the University of Westminster.

01-Jun-2014 Layers of Consent

Journal articles

Townend, J., 2014. Layers of consent. Ethical Space, 11(3), pp.25–29.

This paper argues that highly-developed television documentary-making techniques could provide a model more generally for journalists navigating the complicated process of obtaining contributors’ consent. Keywords: ethics of consent, television documentary, digital speed, media regulation

03-Apr-2014 Online chilling effects in England and Wales

Journal articles

Townend, Judith 2014. Online chilling effects in England and Wales. Internet Policy Review.

Open and free internet-based platforms are seen as an enabler of global free expression, releasing writers from commercial and space constraints. However, many are working without the assistance of an in-house lawyer, or other legal resources. This may lead to undue suppression of public interest material, with important implications for freedom of expression and the democratic function of media. Two online surveys among digital and online journalists in England and Wales in 2013 indicated that the majority of encounters with defamation and privacy law take place outside the courts, with few formally recorded legal actions. This was particularly evident in a sample of ‘hyperlocal’ and local community publishers. In light of the results, this paper calls for a reappraisal of overly simplistic judicial and media applications of the ‘chilling effect’ doctrine, in order to expose its subjectivities and complexities. Additionally, attention needs to be paid to global and cross-jurisdictional media-legal environments, in order to help develop better internet policy and legal frameworks for protecting legitimate expression.

01-Jul-2013 Closed Data: Defamation and Privacy Disputes in England & Wales

Townend, J., 2013. Closed Data: Defamation and Privacy Disputes in England and Wales. Journal of Media Law, 5(1), pp.31–44.

The Coalition Government has prioritised 'open data' as a 'powerful tool' to 'empower citizens', with a 'transparency commitment' to publish more crime and anonymised sentencing data and the Ministry of Justice has set out an open data strategy covering both civil and criminal courts. However, legal researchers frequently encounter inaccessible or 'closed' data, when they attempt to access basic information concerning civil cases. Better-organised and more open information would help inform public debates relating to procedural and substantive civil law - the discussion around libel reform and privacy-related interim injunctions, for example. This paper will argue that a lack of public data about defamation and privacy litigation, indicated by the Impact Assessment for the Defamation Bill 2012 and the report by the Master of the Rolls' Committee on Super-Injunctions in 2011, hampers the policy-making process, public debate and academic research around these issues of public interest.

01-Jan-2013 Leveson online: A publicly reported inquiry

Townend, J., 2013. Leveson online: A publicly reported inquiry. Ethical Space, 10(1), pp.14–21.

The Leveson Inquiry has broken new ground for court and political reporting: for the first time a public inquiry held under the Inquiries Act 2005 has been played out live on the internet. Online media provided a chance for ordinary members of the public, non-profit groups and small media organisations to expand and question mainstream media narratives, as they watched, blogged and tweeted proceedings. This paper considers public access to the inquiry, arguing that digital communication has allowed for a newly liberated form of debate and enhanced the public’s entitlement to report what they hear in court, in accordance with a longstanding legal tradition of open justice. Additionally, it has improved UK citizens’ right to freedom of expression – which includes the right to receive as well as impart information and ideas. The public’s increased access to inquiry resources and reporting tools does not necessarily indicate a greater role on the ‘news stage’, but it opens up the possibility for greater public influence on news discourse, and beyond that, political debate.

01-Jul-2012 Justice Wide Open: Working Papers

Townend (ed.), 2012. Justice wide open: working papers. [online] London, UK: Centre for Law Justice and Journalism, City University London.



 

01-Jun-2012 The Scandal of Selective Reporting.

Journal articles

Bennett, D., and Townend, J., 2012. The Scandal of Selective Reporting. British Journalism Review, 23(2), pp.60–66.
 

07-Feb-2012 Press ‘Omerta’: How Newspapers’ Failure to Report the Phone Hacking Scandal Exposed the Limitations of Media Accountability

Chapters

Bennett, D., and Townend, J., 2012. Press ‘Omerta’: How Newspapers’ Failure to Report the Phone Hacking Scandal Exposed the Limitations of Media Accountability. In: The Phone Hacking Scandal: Journalism on Trial, Second edition. Bury St Edmunds, UK: Abramis.

This article argues that explanations for the non-reporting of the phone hacking scandal need to delve beyond simplistic, if valid, assertions of industry cover-up. We analyse how a definition of ‘newsworthiness’ based on the public interest can be undermined by a combination of professional, political and commercial interests. Together they form an explanation for the press’s collective redaction of developments in the phone hacking story until July 2011. We demonstrate, therefore, that the vigour of journalism and healthy democratic debate is not merely dependent on the effective regulation of what is reported, it is also dependent on ensuring that harmful illegal activity is regarded as sufficiently ‘newsworthy’ to be investigated and reported.

01-Jan-2011 Navigating digital publishing law without a ‘night lawyer’: an exploration of informal legal support networks

Journal articles

Townend, J., 2011. Navigating digital publishing law without a ‘night lawyer’: an exploration of informal legal support networks. Cultural Policy, Criticism and Management Research, 5, pp.27–46.

Newspapers employ ‘night lawyers’, specialised legal professionals who check copy before the next day’s paper goes to press. But in a ‘new media’ age of blogging and communication through social media, writers and publishers with restricted budgets often operate without any legal insurance or paid-for legal advice. A survey of 71 small, independent online content publishers based in the UK, conducted in 2010, revealed that of 19 online writers who were contacted over a legal matter in the last two years, only seven sought legal advice, which was paid for in four instances. The remaining 12 dealt with it alone. This paper examines how the legal landscape is changing with the development of digital media; the uncertainty this causes for small online publishers with limited legal and financial resources; the growth of informal support networks; and why more research in this area is important.

Publications available on SAS-space:

Date Details
Feb-2016 Censorship and National Security: Information Control in the Second World War and Present Day

PeerReviewed

The recent criminal trials of Erol Incedal on terrorism-related charges, in which central details were kept secret from the public, suggests a lack of clarity about information control in a contemporary context. It is legitimate to restrict information in the interest of national security, but only where this is strictly necessary and when safeguards exist to maintain open justice and freedom of expression. The British experience of security censorship during the Second World War provides a compelling case study of information control in an otherwise open society that should be used to inform future policy. The self-regulated system adopted during the Second World War ensured considerable press freedom, but was hindered by a lack of planning and poor co-ordination between the press and competing authorities. The Second World War case study suggests that information control procedures will always be contentious but that they can be made more successful through careful planning and co-ordination, the involvement of a broad range of representatives, and an awareness of the public interest in imparting and receiving information. Both the historic and contemporary case studies indicate that information control in an open society will rely upon a degree of self-regulation and require clear guidelines, co-operation, and opportunities for dialogue.

Special issue - Beyond clickbait and commerce: The ethics, possibilities and challenges of not-for-profit media

PeerReviewed

This special issue of Ethical Space explores the ethical dilemmas arising in the turbulent journalistic environment created by digital transformation and its impact on the traditional media business model.

Additional Publications

Publications available in Senate House Libraries

Research Projects & Supervisions

Research projects:

Details
(Contributor) UK in a Changing Europe stakeholder workshops

Helped faciliate two workshops in May and June 2016 which were part of an ESRC project led by Professor Alison Harcourt at the University of Exeter. One dealt with audio-visual media policy, the other with data transfer and data protection.

(Facilitator) Ad hoc research group on the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill

The Information Law and Policy Centre (ILPC) at IALS facilitated an ad hoc research group of academics and practitioners to contribute to the ongoing policy debate on surveillance following publication of the government’s Draft Investigatory Powers Bill. Members of this group have now published a clause-by-clause review examining their provenance – that is, whether the clauses come from existing legislation, or are newly introduced. Lorna Woods, IALS senior associate research fellow and professor in law at the University of Essex, has since submitted a revised version in her evidence to the joint select committee scrutinising the Bill. The committee used her evidence in its report published in February 2016, for a table describing each investigatory capability in the draft bill (pp.32-37).

(Research associate) Media Power and Plurality

A media policy research project based at the University of Westminster’s Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC) from 2013-14. Judith Townend was research associate.

(Researcher) The impact of charity and tax law/regulation on not-for-profit news organisations

This collaborative research project is exploring the impact of national charity and tax laws and regulation on efforts to establish and operate not-for-profit news organisations. It focuses on UK, US, Canada, Australia and Ireland, all developed countries with Anglo-based legal systems. The project is led jointly by the Reuters Institute, University of Oxford, and the Information Society Project, Yale Law School, Yale University. Judith Townend is the researcher for the UK case study.

Relevant Events

Related events:

Date Details
22-Feb-2017 Launch of 'Protecting sources and whistleblowers in a digital age' report

Participated in launch of co-authored report 'Protecting sources and whistleblowers in a digital age' at a reception in the House of Lords.

08-Dec-2016 FOI at 250

Co-organiser of 'FOI at 250' event marking 250 years since the passing of Sweden's first right to information law. Speakers included the new Information Commissioner, Elizabeth Denham, and Lord James Wallace of Tankerness, former member of Scottish Government, who piloted the Freedom of Information Act through the Scottish Parliament.

09-Nov-2016 Annual Information Law and Policy workshop

Co-organiser of the Information Law and Policy's second annual workshop on 9th November 2016. The workshop’s theme was: ‘Restricted and Redacted: Where now for human rights and digital information control?’ and selected papers were published in a special issue of Communications Law.

16-Sep-2016 Protecting sources and whistleblowers in a digital age

Organised by-invitation workshop on source protection for 25 investigative journalists, NGO and policy representatives and lawyers for an initiative supported by Guardian News and Media. Has resulted in report to be published in February 2017.

07-Sep-2016 Society of Legal Scholars annual conference, University of Oxford

Accepted paper, media law section, Society of Legal Scholars annual conference, University of Oxford, September 2016.

03-Aug-2016 International Association of Law Libraries (IALL) annual course

Invited presentation on data protection and the 'right to be forgotten', International Association of Law Libraries (IALL) annual conference, University of Oxford, August 2016

28-Jun-2016 Seminar on Anonymous Speech

Organised seminar to mark launch of Anonymous Speech: Law, Literature and Politics by Eric Barendt (Hart Publishing, 2016).

14-Jun-2016 Seminars on freedom of expression and media law in Seoul

Speaker at Chung-Ang Law School seminar on Freedom of Expression with Regard to Terror, Right to be Forgotten & Social Media; and Media Law Forum at the Press Arbitration Commission , Seoul, June 2016.

11-Jun-2016 International Communication Association (ICA) annual conference, Fukuoka

Panelist in a session on social media law at the International Communication Association (ICA) annual conference, Fukuoka, June 2016.

01-Jun-2016 ‘The Body of Law’

Helped faciliate exhibition by the artist Isobel Williams at Senate House in June-July 2016.

23-May-2016 Roundtable meeting on open justice and courts data

Organised roundtable meeting on open justice and courts data.

27-Apr-2016 Third Winchester Conference on Trust, Risk, Information and the Law

Invited panelist on open justice and open data, TRILCon, Third Winchester Conference on Trust, Risk, Information and the Law, University of Winchester, 27 April 2016.

16-Mar-2016 Openness in Britain 2016: Where Are We Now?

Openness in Britain 2016: Where Are We Now? With Ben Worthy (Birkbeck), Maurice Frankel (Campaign for Freedom of Information) and Heather Brooke (City University London).

08-Mar-2016 Surveillance and Human Rights seminar

Respondent to discussion on Surveillance and Human Rights - evening seminar with Kirsty Brimelow QC (Doughty Street Chambers) and Silkie Carlo (Liberty).

05-Feb-2016 ‘Overseeing the Secret State’: a symposium on the draft Investigatory Powers Bill

Speaker at ‘Overseeing the Secret State’: a symposium on the draft Investigatory Powers Bill, University of Cambridge, 5 February 2016

19-Nov-2015 The Humanity of Lawyers (Being Human Festival 2015)

The Humanity of Lawyers, Inner Temple, London. Presented by the Information Law and Policy Centre, IALS, as part of the Being Human festival 2015.

27-Oct-2015 Universities and Counter-terrorism: PREVENT in Practice.

Universities and Counter-terrorism: PREVENT in Practice. Organised by the School of Advanced Study, University of London. Hosted by the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies.

20-Oct-2015 Democracy, governance and media reform in Sri Lanka and the Commonwealth

Speaker at ‘Democracy, governance and media reform in Sri Lanka and the Commonwealth’, seminar at the Institute of Commonwealth Studies, 20 October 2015

19-Oct-2015 Whose Investigatory Power Is It Anyway? Security, Source Protection and Surveillance

Whose Investigatory Power Is It Anyway? Security, Source Protection and Surveillance debate at Reed Smith LLP. The Media Society and the Information Law and Policy Centre, IALS.

09-Oct-2015 What Next for Community Journalism?

Speaker on charitable funding for journalism at community journalism event at University of Cardiff, 9 October 2015.

28-Sep-2015 Freedom of Information: Extending Transparency to the Private Sector

Freedom of Information: Extending Transparency to the Private Sector at Baker & McKenzie LLP was presented by the Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law jointly with the Information Law and Policy Centre at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, and hosted by Law Firm, Baker & McKenzie. It considered the current legal framework and the range of private sector organisations that have been brought within its scope. It explored differences in transparency requirements for private contractors, and proposals to further extend the FOI regime to private companies providing public services. The event provided an opportunity to hear both sides of the debate surrounding this important topic and the practical implications of reforms in this area. Keynote speaker: Rosemary Agnew (Scottish Information Commissioner). Panelists: Steve Goodrich (Open Governance Researcher, Transparency International UK); Heather Rogers QC (One Brick Court); Martin Rosenbaum (Freedom of Information Specialist, BBC News); Dr Ben Worthy (Lecturer in Politics, Birkbeck College, University of London). Chair: Timothy Pitt-Payne QC (11 King's Bench Walk).

25-Sep-2015 The Right to be Forgotten: Removal Criteria and Procedures

In this afternoon seminar hosted by the Information Law and Policy Centre at IALS, Professor Bernd Holznagel, Director of University of Münster’s Institute for Information, Telecommunications and Media Law, offered his perspective on the European Court of Justice's decision in Google Spain SL v. AEPD / Costeja Gonzàlez, focusing on different proposals for removal criteria and procedures. The discussion was chaired by Dr Irini Katsirea, Reader of International Media Law at the Department of Journalism Studies, University of Sheffield.

This seminar was co-organised by the Information Law and Policy Centre at the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies; the Middlesex University School of Law; and the Department of Journalism Studies, University of Sheffield.

25-Jun-2015 Data of our Lives: Global Privacy, Reputation and Freedom of Expression

(Chair and academic organiser) A half-day discussion seminar hosted by the Information Law and Policy Centre at IALS and ARTICLE 19 with special guest Frank LaRue, former UN special rapporteur on freedom of expression. It is just over one year since “the right to be forgotten” became firmly established in media discourse, following the European Court of Justice’s decision in Google Spain v AEPD and Mario Costeja González and its ruling that the company, and other search engines, must respond to users’ de-listing requests under EU data protection law. This small discussion seminar, featuring Frank LaRue, former UN special rapporteur on freedom of expression, took a global perspective on the Google Spain case, and related issues of privacy, reputation and freedom of expression. Our discussion looked ahead to the forthcoming EU General Data Protection Regulation, and consider the broader international context for data privacy, including, for example, Max Schrems’ case in the ECJ which challenges the EU-US Safe Harbor agreement that allows US companies to transfer European personal data to US-based servers. Attendees were invited to use the seminar as an opportunity to discuss ideas for further research-based activity and collaboration on global data privacy, reputation and freedom of expression.

12-Jun-2015 Joint seminar of the DP Forum and NADPO (The National Association of Data Protection Officers)

Speaker at industry group meeting: An Introduction to the Information Law and Policy Centre

11-Jun-2015 Media, power and plurality: old problems, new policies

(Speaker) This seminar marked the publication of a new book edited by Steven Barnett and Judith Townend and featuring a number of international scholars. The event took place in the aftermath of a UK election in which media plurality was an explicit election issue, and whose outcome some commentators believe was heavily influenced by political campaigning in the traditional press. The seminar discussed some of the policy issues around media plurality and media ownership in the UK and Europe, to what extent new policy thinking and ideas might be politically feasible, and whether such initiatives are applicable across different nation states.

07-May-2015 LSE Law and Communications Network workshop: Positive free speech

Presentation on "Positive free speech & public access to courts" at specialist workshop on the rationales, methods and implications of positive free speech organised by Andrew Scott, Associate Professor, Department of Law, LSE and Andrew Kenyon, Professor of Law, University of Melbourne and Shimizu Visiting Professor of Law, LSE.
 

21-Apr-2015 Winchester Conference on Trust, Risk, Information and the Law

Plenary panel speaker: "Is Data Protection the New Defamation?"

01-Apr-2015 SLSA Annual Conference 2015, University of Warwick

Paper on "Information about information law and the effects of its release and restriction" in the Law Enforcement, Regulation and the Use, Abuse and Control of Information stream.

24-Feb-2015 Launch of the Information Law and Policy Centre

(Academic organiser) This launch event brought together academics and practitioners from a variety of backgrounds to share their research and ideas. Among the speakers at an afternoon workshop titled ‘Information flows and dams’ were Daithí Mac Síthigh, Reader in Law at Newcastle University, on ‘computers and the Coalition’ - an impressive digest of the incumbent government’s record on communication law; Marion Oswald, Senior Fellow at University of Winchester, on privacy vigilantism and information warfare; and Ian Brown, Professor of Information Security and Privacy at University of Oxford, on ‘dimensions of cybersecurity’. More guests joined us for an evening lecture delivered by Timothy Pitt-Payne QC, barrister at 11KBW and specialist in information rights, on ‘Does Privacy Matter?’, an eloquent and thoughtful talk on the regulation of privacy in the UK and beyond, exploring social expectations and identifying the areas in most need of further research.

19-Nov-2014 The Humanity of Judging (Being Human Festival 2015)

(Academic organiser) A special evening organised by the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and the Supreme Court, as part of the Being Human Festival, offered participants a tour of the court followed by a discussion on judging in the 21st century. Chair: Lord Carnwath, Supreme Court Judge and chair of the Advisory Council of the Institute for Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) | Panelist 1: Alexandra Marks, Recorder and High Court Deputy judge / Judicial Appointments Commissioner | Panelist 2: Dr Lawrence McNamara, Deputy Director & Senior Research Fellow, Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law | Panelist 3: Professor Leslie Moran, Principle Investigator, Judicial Images Network, School of Law Birkbeck | Panelist 4: Professor Erika Rackley, Professor of Law, Birmingham Law School.

Back to top