Contact details

Name:
Mr Steven Jefferson
Qualifications:
BA, PgDip, MRes, MCIL
Position:
Research Student
Institute:
Institute of Modern Languages Research
Email address:
steven.jefferson@postgrad.sas.ac.uk
Studies:
Student

Publication Details

Related publications/articles:

Date Details
02-May-2015 Distant Readings: Topologies of German Culture in the Long Nineteenth Century

Review

Published in Journal of Contemporary European Studies

02-May-2015 Literary Translation and the Idea of a Minor Romania

Review

Published in Journal of Contemporary European Studies

16-Apr-2015 Eliten und zivile Gesellschaft: Legitimitätskonflikte in Ostmitteleuropa

Review

 Published in Reviews in History

23-Sep-2014 Mediating Memory in the Museum: Trauma, Empathy, Nostalgia

Review

Published in Journal of Contemporary European Studies

30-May-2014 Ethnic Cleansing and the European Union: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Security, Memory and Ethnography

Review

Published in Journal of Contemporary European Studies

04-Mar-2014 Right-Wing Populism in Europe: Politics and Discourse

Review

Published in Journal of Contemporary European Studies

Nationalistische Politik und Ressentiments: Deutsche und Polen von 1871 bis zur Gegenwart, Berichte und Studien

Review

 Published in Cultural History

Research Projects & Supervisions
PhD Topic:

Exodus, Expulsion, Explication: Collective Memories of Silesia as a German-Polish Frontier Zone

My thesis addresses the events concomitant to, and ramifications of, Poland’s post-World-War-Two frontier changes. These include the flight and expulsion of Germans from those parts of Germany annexed by Poland in 1945 (controversially known as the ‘Regained Territories’); population transfers resulting from the USSR’s annexation of Eastern Poland, and anti-Polish pogroms by Ukrainian nationalists in East Galicia.

The object of study comprises two distinct components: a central trauma complex; and the resulting collective memory discourse.

To ensure a focused exposition of the theoretical framework and the sources analysed, my thesis is primarily centred upon Lower Silesia.

I address the following questions: what geo-socio-political constraints and imperatives resulted in Poland’s post-war frontier changes and the central trauma complex with which this thesis is concerned, and how were they justified and understood at the time? How have historians reacted to these events and to contemporary framework narratives relating to them? To what extent and how has the toponymic situation in the ‘Regained Territories’ influenced the collective memory discourse triggered by the central trauma complex? How have different socio-political conditions constrained and shaped the production of literary contributions to this collective memory discourse, and how and to what extent has literature contributed, in turn, to the collective memory discourse and the creation of what I refer to throughout my thesis as ‘the permanent historical record’?

My thesis contributes to existing scholarship on collective memory studies, discourse analysis, narratology, cartography and toponymy, as well as comparative literature (East and West German, and Polish). To a lesser extent it also addresses the historical study of Poland, Ukraine and Britain, identity studies, and questions of German victimhood in the shadow of the Holocaust, and contributes to philosophical questions concerning epistemology and essentialism.

Supervisor:
Dr Katia Pizzi; Dr Catherine Davies; Dr. Torsten Lorenz
Research interests:
Ancient History, Civil Rights, Colonies & Colonization, emigration & immigration, Communities, Classes, Races, Contemporary History, Cultural memory, Culture, Early Modern, History, Human rights, International Relations, Language and Literature (German), Literatures in a modern language, Medieval History, Metropolitan history, Modern History , Music, Neuroscience, Philosophy, Regional history, Romanticism, Socialism, Communism, Anarchism

Regions:
England, Europe, Ireland, Scotland, United Kingdom, Wales
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